The Game of Bridge – Demonstration

In the new year let us resolve to work on enhanced family bonding through BRIDGE a joyful and challenging card game.

Here’s the link to a  research report that confirms that students who learn to play Bridge dramatically improve their test scores across subjects.  http://web2.acbl.org/documentLibrary/teachers/statisticallyspeaking.pdf

Research has also  confirmed that for adults, playing Bridge enhances the memory and reasoning and substantially lowers the risk of Dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Anyone in the age group 8 to 80 years can join.

Choose a convenient date to register in advance for the FREE demonstration of The Game of Bridge Programme https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwscOmupj8jG9ZhpmYQRhQRg5wdZRaiU2t6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

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Hourly Schedule

New Day

Date

Jan 21 2021

Time

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

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The Game of Bridge Programme

Bridge is a mind sport that stimulates both the left and right sides of the brain. Playing bridge improves your skills in concentration, communication, logic, imagination, lateral thinking, mathematics, memory, patience, multitasking, visualization, and psychology.   Learning Bridge is also linked with improved academic performance. There was one study done in America which links increased test scores in children with playing Bridge.

Here's the link to the report http://web2.acbl.org/documentLibrary/teachers/statisticallyspeaking.pdf

Let us hear from players across the globe why you should play Bridge - https://www.facebook.com/100008607931982/videos/2350125225284386/

A study released by the College of Medicine of Yeshiva University found "Playing chess, bridge or a musical instrument significantly lowers the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia, according to the most comprehensive study to examine the benefits of challenging intellectual activity among the elderly."